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Advertising Information

Today's Coach has been consistently published weekly for many years.  It has come to be known as the premier Coaching Industry ezine.  With over 15,000 subscribers, your ad will be seen by folks who are interested in furthering their coaching practices and businesses.  Each issue of Today's Coach is full of industry relevant news and information. View sample issues here .

Your ad will be featured for 1 issue of  Today's Coach, which is published every Tuesday

Ads Accepted Per Issue: 1
Estimated Subscriber Count: 15,000
Ad Insertion Run: 1 week/1 issue
Location of Ads: Top placement in ezine
Fee for insertion: Introductory Rate: $250USD

Ad Specifications:

1) Formatted as a .jpg or .gif
2) 72 dpi
3) no wider than 125 px
4) no taller than 400 px
5) File size no larger than 30K

Click here  for"ezine advertising terms of service".
Click here to purchase now


How To Write "Selling" Ad Copy

Writing selling copy is key to the success of your ad. Here's an example of well-written, selling ad copy

Stop Your Divorce:
http://www.stopyourdivorce.com
The site may look simple, but it brings in $200,000+ in ebook sales annually for Dean Jackson.

"Selling" ad copy includes the following elements:

  1. Speak directly to the reader, often in first person.  Be their equal.
  2. Stand in their shoes and experience 3 things they are experiencing in life and in their coaching practice. Have your product or service offer a solution, a fresh approach and/or a possibility for each of these 3 things. Add credibility/believe-ability by including 3 testimonials that readers can identify with (no puffery).
  3. Reduce risk by offering a money-back guarantee.
  4. Offer a way for readers to experience you before buying-- free TeleClass, free session, free use of product for 30 days, etc.


How to Double the Response Rate of Your Ad in the Today's Coach

Introduction

Coaches respond to certain types of ads and they virtually ignore other types of ads.  The tone, style and essence of your ad, how you seek to serve the coaching community, matters greatly to our readers.  This Top 12 List will work wonders for the effectiveness of your ad.  

1.  Speak to coaches directly.

Use the word you as much as you use the word coach.  Simple. But it works.  

2.  Stand in their shoes and speak from that place.

It's tempting to talk about your product or service, but START by imagining first what the coaches are experiencing and feeling in their practice and segue from there to how your product or service will serve, support, challenge or otherwise add value to them where they are!  Coaches are under a lot of pressure -- to learn, to grow, to get clients, to give good advice, to coach well and to improve their quality of life.  How will your product or service directly assist them?

3. Provide examples and situations where your product or service will work.

Ask yourself:  What are the top 5 scenarios or situations in which coaches find themselves that my product will work best to solve their problem or create an opportunity?  Be specific.

4. Include well-written, highly-specific testimonials from customers who are coaches.

Make sure that you select the testimonials that SHOW how your product or service works, the benefits people get from using it and how sustainable/long-term those benefits are. With permission, use actual coach's names and include a link to their email and/or websites.  Builds credibility. 

5.  Speak to common objections that coaches would have about your product or service.

Weave in these 'answers' into your ad copy and/or the testimonials.  Speak to at least 5 such concerns/objections that a buyer might have.

6.  Inform the coach who it is that can BEST use your product or service.

Few products or services are best for every coach.  And every coach isn't every coach, if you know what I mean.  If your product is for the advanced coach, say so!  If your product can be used differently, depending on who the coach is, give examples of who is using it an how.

7.  Include a logo/graphic of your product/service and a photograph of you and/or your team.

Logos/graphics make your products more credible.  And a (professionally done) photograph of you builds trust and builds your personal brand.  

8.  Give the coach some way to test out or experience a piece of what you are offering.

If you offer software, offer a trial version.  If you are offering a TeleProgram, have a free intro session.  If you're offering an ebook, offer the first 3 chapters for free.  The online buying public demands a free taste or trial or at least a venue in which to get to know you or your product better.

9.  Invite the coach to join you in improving your product or service.

You can use the Coaching Scoop as a way to build your own R&D Team.  Coaches WANT to play around creative people doing innovative things.  A number of communities/networks have already been launched by advertisers in the Coaching Scoop.  Invite folks to join your ezine, early-announcement list, special invite list, etc.

10  Offer a clear incentive for the reader to act now or by a certain date.

Offer 10% to 50% off the pricing of your product or service.  Offer to include something extra (free copy, free coaching, free mug, whatever) if they act by a certain date.  Deadlines and incentives work.  They just do.

11. Make it clear what single action you want the reader to take right now.

What do you most want the reader to do?  To call you?  Email you?  Order online?  Visit your site?  Test the product?  Register?  Join your email list?  Pick the single action that you want them to take and make sure you orient your ad copy around this.  In the ad copy, ask them several times to take this action.  Repetition/trial closes work.

12. Make sure passion and excitement is conveyed in the tone of your ad copy.

Not hype, but your excitement for your product or service needs to shine through in order to reach the soul of the coach.  Hire a professional writer to spiff up your announcement if necessary.  

Copyright 2001 by Thomas J. Leonard.  All rights reserved.